A Facebook employee asked a reporter to turn off his phone so Facebook couldn’t track its location — and it reveals a bigger problem within the company

13 comments

  1. I_M_THE_ONE

    |Author

    The thing that was very interesting to me was how did facebook have access to GChat ?

    > Then she told him that she had their messages on Gchat, which Fearnow had assumed weren’t accessible to Facebook

  2. edgework88

    |Author

    Nothing surprises me about FB anymore. It’s gone from social ‘tool’ to devious snooper? After using it for a few years I ditched it 4 years ago and have never missed it.

  3. dirtynj

    |Author

    The biggest problem is that apps are just going overkill on permissions. Why does every app need permission to everything on my phone?

    Whenever I look at an app, or an extension and it says “…access all your data” I just nope right out. I’ve really slimmed down on my app use because so many apps just want open access to all contents on my phone.

    I love it when I see an app that says “this app does not require any special permissions.” Devs need to be more like that app.

  4. iamthepaddIes

    |Author

    I can’t speak for the Facebook app, but Messenger has no issues running without any permissions, and never once prompted me to grant location access.

    Then again, I don’t use any of those gimmicky features like location sharing and whatnot.

  5. bushwacker

    |Author

    After ten years of owning nothing but Samsung, I got an Oppo.

    I can set every app to allow, disallow or ask every time for every permission.

    The camera is not as good, but there is next to no bloatware and I just started to touch on the security. I also like the fact that without rooting I can stop any app I want from autostarting and restrict network to WiFi, cell both or neither.

    I will get a compact camera and I am done with Samsung. I am happier with this $200 phone than my Galaxy S7.

  6. cymrich

    |Author

    I don’t get what they are trying to say at the end there…

    >The fact an employee would think such an option was on the table is telling of the culture at the company

    the reporter is the one that wants the interview… the reporter should be fine with protecting their anonymous sources… so why would this be a problem?

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