Music Piracy Continues To Drop Dramatically, But The Industry Hates To Admit That Because It Ruins The Narrative

22 comments

  1. I’ll still pirate movies and TV as there aren’t great subscription services that have it all, it’s all segmented and selection isn’t always great. I haven’t pirated music in a long time as I have tidal and Spotify

  2. baxterrocky

    |Author

    I still don’t understand how paying $12 a month for Spotify literally gets me access to ALL THE MUSIC IN THE UNIVERSE…

    How do musicians make money these days?? Live performances obvs, but surely they can’t get as much from Spotify (or equivalent) online services as they did back in the day with CD/ tape sales.

    Or am I wrong?? I literally have no idea.

  3. cr0ft

    |Author

    It’s simple; no matter what their profits are, it’s never enough. Not only are they destroying the music by continuing the asinine Loudness War they started, the big labels can’t leave well enough alone and keep up this stupid nonsense.

    Hell, they should be upset about there being so little illicit copying, copying was always a good thing as it exposed people to new material and they then went out and bought it, and quite possible the entire back catalog of some artist they really took to. Streaming has taken over some of that of course, but the problem was never the fact that some people copied – the problem is and has always been getting people to hear the material in the first place so they realize they want to buy it. We’re flooded with such enormous amounts of entertainment these days nobody can even keep up. Standing out from the dross is the challenge.

  4. frogandbanjo

    |Author

    I mean… you can go on the internet and find basically any song you want streaming via YouTube, for free. Is it piracy? Is *somebody* violating copyright law somewhere? Are there *actually* licensing agreements being honored in the background? **** if the average internet user knows. All they know is that they can listen to any song they want for free at any time.

    In that kind of environment, either piracy is *de facto* legal, or it’s quite reasonable to infer that it’s waaaaaaaay down.

  5. evenios

    |Author

    how many copies of

    “steal this album” by System of a Down were stolen?

    and if you shoplifted it and got caught could you use it to your defense?

    lol (/s)

  6. gunslinger_006

    |Author

    I stopped pirating music as soon as streaming services became legit.

    Make it easy to access your ****, or dont… but people will make it easy if you make it hard.

    Choose.

  7. matheusmoreira

    |Author

    The truth is any service that doesn’t provide “everything ever created, at the highest possible quality, uncensored, without DRM, in one place, for a negligible price, whenever you want, forever” fails to compete with piracy. Ironically, the copyright holders are too busy competing with each other and fragmenting the market instead of building something that’s actually equal to or better than piracy. Humanity won’t be able to move forward until copyright is abolished.

  8. ahoychoy

    |Author

    Great example of how smart, modern services can be good for an industry and people at the same time. I honestly stopped pirating music as soon as I got Spotify and Apple Music. Haven’t since.

  9. Genrawir

    |Author

    The dumbest part of this whole thing is that film and tv studios could learn from spotify and come up with a streaming service with everything ever produced available in an alacarte fashion and reduce piracy overnight, instead of trying to get people to pay for a dozen different platforms as they try to reproduce cable TV on the internet.

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